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Donall and Conall Convince the Mormon Missionaries They’re Going to Hell in 40.305 Seconds

October 31, 2015 Leave a comment

Lutheran Satire at its best:

“Do your best and God will do the rest” isn’t a Gospel promise. It’s a guarantee of eternal condemnation. Let our Irish friends explain why in record time.

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Categories: Unbelief

The Heresies of Matthew Becker

February 14, 2015 Leave a comment

UPDATE: Becker resigned from the LCMS. Too bad he’s still a heretic.

When a so-called pastor of the LCMS claims (http://matthewlbecker.blogspot.com/2013/02/one-more-response-to-hrc.html):

“How can any evangelical preacher proclaim that any one specific person who has died is in hell? What arrogance! What idolatry! That is not “rude,” that is blasphemy! What an uncaring, hard-hearted, mean-spirited mindset. It makes the death of Jesus cheap, it limits his atonement, it denies the promise that Paul proclaims in Rom. 11:32 and several other places (1 Cor. 15:22-28, etc.), it rejects the hope that Peter gives in Acts 3:21, it ignores the central affirmation in John 3:16-17

and (http://matthewlbecker.blogspot.com/2013/02/one-more-response-to-hrc.html?showComment=1360462160246#c1875406929959943482):

“The Athanasian Creed errs when it implies that one is saved by a mental work of believing this creed’s humanly-devised dogmatic statements ‘faithfully and firmly’… Its conclusion is simply incorrect. The Athanasian Creed muddles the gospel at precisely this point”

He must be marked and avoided (Rom. 16:17-18) and eventually removed from the roster of the LCMS.

HT: Nicholas @ SteadfastLutherans.org

Categories: Unbelief, Wrong Worship

Preaching what you do not believe? – Pr Larry Peters – Pastoral Meanderings

May 1, 2014 Leave a comment

It is not the first time I have encountered this.  Preachers who complain that they preach on Sunday what they cannot in their hearts believe and refuse to accept. . . preachers who make up their sermons because they cannot speak from the vantage point of faith.  One more time I read a post by a clergyman, no longer a preacher, relieved at not having to live the deception any longer.

It is not the first time I have encountered this.  Preachers who complain that they preach on Sunday what they cannot in their hearts believe and refuse to accept. . . preachers who make up their sermons because they cannot speak from the vantage point of faith.  One more time I read a post by a clergyman, no longer a preacher, relieved at not having to live the deception any longer. – See more at: http://pastoralmeanderings.blogspot.com/#sthash.K1fss0MM.dpuf
It is not the first time I have encountered this.  Preachers who complain that they preach on Sunday what they cannot in their hearts believe and refuse to accept. . . preachers who make up their sermons because they cannot speak from the vantage point of faith.  One more time I read a post by a clergyman, no longer a preacher, relieved at not having to live the deception any longer. – See more at: http://pastoralmeanderings.blogspot.com/#sthash.K1fss0MM.dpuf
It is not the first time I have encountered this.  Preachers who complain that they preach on Sunday what they cannot in their hearts believe and refuse to accept. . . preachers who make up their sermons because they cannot speak from the vantage point of faith.  One more time I read a post by a clergyman, no longer a preacher, relieved at not having to live the deception any longer. – See more at: http://pastoralmeanderings.blogspot.com/#sthash.K1fss0MM.dpuf

It is not the first time I have encountered this. Preachers who complain that they preach on Sunday what they cannot in their hearts believe and refuse to accept . . . preachers who make up their sermons because they cannot speak from the vantage point of faith. One more time I read a post by a clergyman, no longer a preacher, relieved at not having to live the deception any longer.

One person put it this way:  I remember when I was a preacher that there were days I felt a profound polarity between what I believed and what I was expected to say. The pressure to bend to expectations was more than I could sometimes bear. I know many preachers under this pressure.

This is something I do not understand nor do I have much patience with — those who stand in the pulpit may not be rock star preachers but I think it is fair to say that their hearers expect them to believe what they preach.  I am not saying that the preacher is not himself struggling with this belief.  Indeed, I preach to myself every Sunday and often times the texts expose the great weakness or temptation or doubt that I face personally.  But I do not preach my doubts or my weakness.  I preach Jesus Christ and Him crucified.  I stand under the cross with the rest of the hearers for the Word that I speak is not mine but the Word of Christ spoken not only through me but also to me.  If the words are mine only, then there is little cause for the hearers to listen to me rather than any other point of view.  The words of the preacher have authority only because they are the Word of the Lord, in a different but no less profound way than the lessons which we read and end by saying “The Word of the Lord.”  I say this not to elevate the preacher but to elevate the Word preached.

I would expect folks in the pew to be shocked and disappointed upon finding out that what they heard on Sunday morning is different from what the preacher actually believes.  If anything we expect some measure of integrity from the clergy, namely that they will not deceive the hearer by preaching something they do not themselves believe.  I know that this is predominantly a problem when the preacher is more liberal than the people in the pews and feels compelled by job security to keep his doubts and skepticism to himself.  But it can also happen when the preacher’s confession changes in the opposite way.  I have known preachers who have struggled with knowing when it is time to give up the call because they have come to believe that the Lutheran Confessions are true and faithful but they are not in a Lutheran congregation.  They key here is to preach faithfully until that point when you cannot.  At that point you owe it to your hearers to be honest.

There have been situations in which the pastor could not in good conscience confess the Apostles’ or Nicene Creed.  In the same way, when your conviction is no longer consistent with your ordination and call, then it is time to call it quits (if not forever, at least for now, until you can return to the office with the integrity of your convictions in tact).  These are not small matters.  Two friends have left churches when they found out the pastors did not believe what the Scriptures said.  In one case the pastor believed the resurrection to be purely spiritual and that someday the bones of Jesus would be found in a cave in Palestine.  In another the pastor flat out denied the efficacy of baptism and insisted, contrary to the church’s catechism and confession, it was nothing but a mere symbol.  In both cases, the folks in the pew felt they could not stay there but the right move would have been for the pastors to remove themselves or be removed.  There is no cause for or reason to justify a polarity between what is preached and the faith confessed.

– See more at: http://pastoralmeanderings.blogspot.com/2014/05/preaching-what-you-do-not-believe.html

It is not the first time I have encountered this.  Preachers who complain that they preach on Sunday what they cannot in their hearts believe and refuse to accept. . . preachers who make up their sermons because they cannot speak from the vantage point of faith.  One more time I read a post by a clergyman, no longer a preacher, relieved at not having to live the deception any longer.One person put it this way:  I remember when I was a preacher that there were days I felt a profound polarity between what I believed and what I was expected to say. The pressure to bend to expectations was more than I could sometimes bear. I know many preachers under this pressure.This is something I do not understand nor do I have much patience with — those who stand in the pulpit may not be rock star preachers but I think it is fair to say that their hearers expect them to believe what they preach.  I am not saying that the preacher is not himself struggling with this belief.  Indeed, I preach to myself every Sunday and often times the texts expose the great weakness or temptation or doubt that I face personally.  But I do not preach my doubts or my weakness.  I preach Jesus Christ and Him crucified.  I stand under the cross with the rest of the hearers for the Word that I speak is not mine but the Word of Christ spoken not only through me but also to me.  If the words are mine only, then there is little cause for the hearers to listen to me rather than any other point of view.  The words of the preacher have authority only because they are the Word of the Lord, in a different but no less profound way than the lessons which we read and end by saying “The Word of the Lord.”  I say this not to elevate the preacher but to elevate the Word preached.I would expect folks in the pew to be shocked and disappointed upon finding out that what they heard on Sunday morning is different from what the preacher actually believes.  If anything we expect some measure of integrity from the clergy, namely that they will not deceive the hearer by preaching something they do not themselves believe.  I know that this is predominantly a problem when the preacher is more liberal than the people in the pews and feels compelled by job security to keep his doubts and skepticism to himself.  But it can also happen when the preacher’s confession changes in the opposite way.  I have known preachers who have struggled with knowing when it is time to give up the call because they have come to believe that the Lutheran Confessions are true and faithful but they are not in a Lutheran congregation.  They key here is to preach faithfully until that point when you cannot.  At that point you owe it to your hearers to be honest.There have been situations in which the pastor could not in good conscience confess the Apostles’ or Nicene Creed.  In the same way, when your conviction is no longer consistent with your ordination and call, then it is time to call it quits (if not forever, at least for now, until you can return to the office with the integrity of your convictions in tact).  These are not small matters.  Two friends have left churches when they found out the pastors did not believe what the Scriptures said.  In one case the pastor believed the resurrection to be purely spiritual and that someday the bones of Jesus would be found in a cave in Palestine.  In another the pastor flat out denied the efficacy of baptism and insisted, contrary to the church’s catechism and confession, it was nothing but a mere symbol.  In both cases, the folks in the pew felt they could not stay there but the right move would have been for the pastors to remove themselves or be removed.  There is no cause for or reason to justify a polarity between what is preached and the faith confessed.   – See more at: http://pastoralmeanderings.blogspot.com/#sthash.K1fss0MM.dpuf

It is not the first time I have encountered this.  Preachers who complain that they preach on Sunday what they cannot in their hearts believe and refuse to accept. . . preachers who make up their sermons because they cannot speak from the vantage point of faith.  One more time I read a post by a clergyman, no longer a preacher, relieved at not having to live the deception any longer.One person put it this way:  I remember when I was a preacher that there were days I felt a profound polarity between what I believed and what I was expected to say. The pressure to bend to expectations was more than I could sometimes bear. I know many preachers under this pressure.This is something I do not understand nor do I have much patience with — those who stand in the pulpit may not be rock star preachers but I think it is fair to say that their hearers expect them to believe what they preach.  I am not saying that the preacher is not himself struggling with this belief.  Indeed, I preach to myself every Sunday and often times the texts expose the great weakness or temptation or doubt that I face personally.  But I do not preach my doubts or my weakness.  I preach Jesus Christ and Him crucified.  I stand under the cross with the rest of the hearers for the Word that I speak is not mine but the Word of Christ spoken not only through me but also to me.  If the words are mine only, then there is little cause for the hearers to listen to me rather than any other point of view.  The words of the preacher have authority only because they are the Word of the Lord, in a different but no less profound way than the lessons which we read and end by saying “The Word of the Lord.”  I say this not to elevate the preacher but to elevate the Word preached.I would expect folks in the pew to be shocked and disappointed upon finding out that what they heard on Sunday morning is different from what the preacher actually believes.  If anything we expect some measure of integrity from the clergy, namely that they will not deceive the hearer by preaching something they do not themselves believe.  I know that this is predominantly a problem when the preacher is more liberal than the people in the pews and feels compelled by job security to keep his doubts and skepticism to himself.  But it can also happen when the preacher’s confession changes in the opposite way.  I have known preachers who have struggled with knowing when it is time to give up the call because they have come to believe that the Lutheran Confessions are true and faithful but they are not in a Lutheran congregation.  They key here is to preach faithfully until that point when you cannot.  At that point you owe it to your hearers to be honest.There have been situations in which the pastor could not in good conscience confess the Apostles’ or Nicene Creed.  In the same way, when your conviction is no longer consistent with your ordination and call, then it is time to call it quits (if not forever, at least for now, until you can return to the office with the integrity of your convictions in tact).  These are not small matters.  Two friends have left churches when they found out the pastors did not believe what the Scriptures said.  In one case the pastor believed the resurrection to be purely spiritual and that someday the bones of Jesus would be found in a cave in Palestine.  In another the pastor flat out denied the efficacy of baptism and insisted, contrary to the church’s catechism and confession, it was nothing but a mere symbol.  In both cases, the folks in the pew felt they could not stay there but the right move would have been for the pastors to remove themselves or be removed.  There is no cause for or reason to justify a polarity between what is preached and the faith confessed.   – See more at: http://pastoralmeanderings.blogspot.com/#sthash.K1fss0MM.dpuf

It is not the first time I have encountered this.  Preachers who complain that they preach on Sunday what they cannot in their hearts believe and refuse to accept. . . preachers who make up their sermons because they cannot speak from the vantage point of faith.  One more time I read a post by a clergyman, no longer a preacher, relieved at not having to live the deception any longer.One person put it this way:  I remember when I was a preacher that there were days I felt a profound polarity between what I believed and what I was expected to say. The pressure to bend to expectations was more than I could sometimes bear. I know many preachers under this pressure.This is something I do not understand nor do I have much patience with — those who stand in the pulpit may not be rock star preachers but I think it is fair to say that their hearers expect them to believe what they preach.  I am not saying that the preacher is not himself struggling with this belief.  Indeed, I preach to myself every Sunday and often times the texts expose the great weakness or temptation or doubt that I face personally.  But I do not preach my doubts or my weakness.  I preach Jesus Christ and Him crucified.  I stand under the cross with the rest of the hearers for the Word that I speak is not mine but the Word of Christ spoken not only through me but also to me.  If the words are mine only, then there is little cause for the hearers to listen to me rather than any other point of view.  The words of the preacher have authority only because they are the Word of the Lord, in a different but no less profound way than the lessons which we read and end by saying “The Word of the Lord.”  I say this not to elevate the preacher but to elevate the Word preached.I would expect folks in the pew to be shocked and disappointed upon finding out that what they heard on Sunday morning is different from what the preacher actually believes.  If anything we expect some measure of integrity from the clergy, namely that they will not deceive the hearer by preaching something they do not themselves believe.  I know that this is predominantly a problem when the preacher is more liberal than the people in the pews and feels compelled by job security to keep his doubts and skepticism to himself.  But it can also happen when the preacher’s confession changes in the opposite way.  I have known preachers who have struggled with knowing when it is time to give up the call because they have come to believe that the Lutheran Confessions are true and faithful but they are not in a Lutheran congregation.  They key here is to preach faithfully until that point when you cannot.  At that point you owe it to your hearers to be honest.There have been situations in which the pastor could not in good conscience confess the Apostles’ or Nicene Creed.  In the same way, when your conviction is no longer consistent with your ordination and call, then it is time to call it quits (if not forever, at least for now, until you can return to the office with the integrity of your convictions in tact).  These are not small matters.  Two friends have left churches when they found out the pastors did not believe what the Scriptures said.  In one case the pastor believed the resurrection to be purely spiritual and that someday the bones of Jesus would be found in a cave in Palestine.  In another the pastor flat out denied the efficacy of baptism and insisted, contrary to the church’s catechism and confession, it was nothing but a mere symbol.  In both cases, the folks in the pew felt they could not stay there but the right move would have been for the pastors to remove themselves or be removed.  There is no cause for or reason to justify a polarity between what is preached and the faith confessed.   – See more at: http://pastoralmeanderings.blogspot.com/#sthash.K1fss0MM.dpuf
Categories: Sermons, Unbelief

Missionaries, Straw Men and Ignorant Assertions – Pr Jonathan Fisk

November 9, 2013 Leave a comment
Categories: Unbelief

Answering the Objections of Unbelievers – Dr. John Warwick Montgomery – Issues, Etc.

June 30, 2013 Leave a comment

Dr. John Warwick Montgomery answers the objections of unbelievers (5 parts) on Issues, Etc.

1.

1. The Existence of God (mp3, 40:48, 16.4 MB)

2.

2. Miracles (mp3, 40:48, 16.4 MB)

3.

3. The Exclusive Claims of Christianity (mp3, 40:48, 16.4 MB)

4.

4. The Problem of Evil (mp3, 40:48, 16.4 MB)

5.

5. Errors & Contradictions in the Bible (mp3, 40:49, 16.4 MB)

Categories: Unbelief

Baptism Saves

January 12, 2013 Leave a comment

Pastor Fisk does an excellent job answering the silly “baptism doesn’t save” comments and questions.

Categories: Catechesis, Unbelief

Shepherds That Hate Their Flocks 4

July 22, 2012 Leave a comment

As they were talking about these things, Jesus himself stood among them, and said to them, “Peace to you!” But they were startled and frightened and thought they saw a spirit. And he said to them, “Why are you troubled, and why do doubts arise in your hearts? See my hands and my feet, that it is I myself. Touch me, and see. For a spirit does not have flesh and bones as you see that I have.” And when he had said this, he showed them his hands and his feet. And while they still disbelieved for joy and were marveling, he said to them, “Have you anything here to eat?” They gave him a piece of broiled fish, and he took it and ate before them. Then he said to them, “These are my words that I spoke to you while I was still with you, that everything written about me in the Law of Moses and the Prophets and the Psalms must be fulfilled.” Then he opened their minds to understand the Scriptures, and said to them, “Thus it is written, that the Christ should suffer and on the third day rise from the dead, and that repentance (Law) and forgiveness of sins (Gospel) should be proclaimed in his (Jesus’) name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem. You are witnesses of these things.”  (Luke 24:36-48 – ESV)

One of the highlighted posts on this blog is about the Issues, Etc., programs on Preaching with Pastor David Petersen. It is a five-part series that should be heard by every lay member of every congregation of the LCMS along with their pastors. Lay people should insist their pastors do the things that Pastor Petersen encourages.

Another highlighted post is Dr. Carl Fickenscher’s series on Sermon Preparation, which should also be viewed by every LCMS layman and pastor. Pastors should be following Dr. Fickenscher’s advice carefully.

Unfortunately, most pastors won’t listen to the series, because their so-called ministries are focused on the wrong things. Instead of the preaching Law and Gospel every sermon, he talks about what he and his family did this past week. Oh, he’ll throw in a little Jesus now and then, but he mostly talks about himself, how his people should be doing this or that (attainable law—third use, even though the Old Adam hears it as second use—sins of omission), how they have separated themselves from those who are heterodox (self-righteousness), or, worse yet, giving them nothing of spiritual value whatsoever.

And forget about the pastor actually studying the Scriptures in the original languages to see how the Gospel (or any) lesson for that Sunday should be preached. No, he’ll just get up and tell us what *he* thinks it means. No context. Either he’s too lazy to study the original languages or just busies himself with “doing ministry” or with his personal life that the languages fall by the wayside.

Mostly, though, he hates his people. He has given up on his promise, spoken so solemnly during his installation, to preach the Gospel in all its truth and purity and to administer the Sacraments according to Christ’s institution. He refuses to confront sins with the Law, especially his own sins, let alone his members’ sins. He refuses to examine the Ten Commandments to see through the mirror of God’s Law how utterly terribly he hates his own parishioners. He would rather neglect telling them that they are damnable sinners, completely deserving of God’s wrath and punishment, including the fire of hell and eternal separation from God. He refuses to call them to repentance and to turn from their sins and believe the Gospel, that Jesus Christ, God’s Son, paid for their sins on the bloody crucifixion cross.

You pastors that can’t be bothered with keeping your promises: quit. Either quit neglecting your promises, or quit the ministry. Either start fulfilling what you promised to do, or you will continue sending your members to hell. Stop hating your people and love them enough to call them to repentance through God’s Law and Gospel. Give them what they so desperately need, even if they are not aware of it: the love of God through Christ Jesus our Lord.

1 John 1:8-10 (ESV):

If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.

1 John 2:1-2 (ESV):

My little children, I am writing these things to you so that you may not sin. But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous. He is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world.

Jesus died for you, faithless shepherd of Christ’s flock, so that you are to now preach the Law in all its sternness and the Gospel in all its sweetness.

Categories: Unbelief, Wrong Worship